Lupin Tabbouleh – Gluten Free

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This is another “replace” recipe of Lupin. Bulgur Wheat, which is normally used in Tabbouleh, is not really common in Australia. So I just thought why can’t we use our Western Australian produce – Lupin instead.

If you are already familiar with Lupin and have made my Lupin Banana Bread   or Lupin Bechamel Sauce, there should be some Lupin flakes left in the kitchen cabinet that you would like to finish off??

Or, if you are new to Lupin, maybe you can make this tabbouleh along with my Lupin Hummus, and then you can have a Middle Eastern style dinner! Lupin is so versatile so I like it. Gluten free is certainly a bonus as well.

Hope you like it.

Ingredients: 

80ml Lupin Flakes

300ml finely chopped Flat-leaf Parsley Leaves

50ml finely chopped Mint Leaves

2 Tomatoes – chopped

1 Lebanese Cucumber – chopped

1 Onion – chopped

150ml Lemon Juice (about 2 lemons)

3 Tablespoons of Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 Teaspoon of Soy Sauce (for gluten free option, please use gluten free soy sauce)

Sea Salt and Black Pepper to season

 

Method: 

  1. Prepare Lupin. Place lupin flakes in cold water and bring to boil. Boil it for 3 minutes. Drain and rinse the lupin a few times, and then drain off the water from the lupin very well. Put it aside.
  2. Put all of herbs and vegetables into a large bowl. Add the lupin, lemon juice, olive oil and soy sauce to the bowl as well. Mix thoroughly and season it with sea salt and black pepper. Serve it cold. It will be better the next day when the flavour has settled.
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SALMON NAMEROU – Another Tataki

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Tataki is one of the Japanese cooking methods. Here in Australia, “beef Tataki” or “tuna tataki” are very common, which is that a piece of protein is seared and the inside is almost raw.

However, today, I would like to introduce another Tataki. This Tataki includes a completely different cooking technique from the seared Tataki. Tataki means “beat” or “slap” in Japanese. To make this Tataki, you need to beat the ingredients with 2 knives (that’s why it’s called Tataki!). And, when you mix the beated version of Tataki with miso, it’s called Namerou.

I cooked my Salmon Namerou for The Chef’s Line, along with my seared Beef Tataki… Well…, Executive Chef Dan Hong seems to not have enjoyed this dish as much as I do…. But I am still a big believer in this dish. Maybe you can try it out and to see if you enjoy the dish as much as I do?

 

Ingredients  (Serving 2-4)

120g of Salmon Fillet ( Sashimi grade, deboned, skin off

1 + 1/2 Teaspoons of Red miso (japanese shinshu red miso)

2 Teaspoons of Soy sauce

1cm cube of Ginger – finely chopped

1 Spring Onion – finely chopped

Method:

  1. Cut up Salmon and Ginger into very small pieces with 2 knives on a chopping board.
  2. Mix the salmon with other ingredients until it becomes sticky,
  3. Serve the salmon in lettuce cups (optional)

 

 

This is how to chop the Salmon!daaaa!!

 

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